Reading From Your Smartphone/Tablet Before Bedtime Can Adversely Impact Sleep

Reading From Your Smartphone/Tablet Before Bedtime Can Adversely Impact Sleep

BOSTON, MA – Use of a light-emitting electronic device (LE-eBook) in the hours before bedtime can adversely impact overall health, alertness, and the circadian clock which synchronizes the daily rhythm of sleep to external environmental time cues, according to researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) who compared the biological effects of reading an LE-eBook compared to a printed book.  These findings of the study are published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on December 22, 2014. “We found the body’s natural circadian rhythms were interrupted by the short-wavelength enriched light, otherwise known as blue light, from these electronic devices,” said Anne-Marie Chang, PhD, corresponding author, and associate neuroscientist in BWH’s Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders. “Participants reading an LE-eBook took longer to fall asleep and had reduced evening sleepiness, reduced melatonin secretion, later timing of their circadian clock and reduced next-morning alertness than when reading a printed book.” Previous research has shown that blue light suppresses melatonin, impacts the circadian clock and increase alertness, but little was known about the effects of this popular technology on sleep.   The use of light emitting devices immediately before bedtime is a concern because of the extremely powerful effect that light has on the body’s natural sleep/wake pattern, and may thereby play a role in perpetuating sleep deficiency. During the two-week inpatient study, twelve participants read LE-e-Books on an iPad for four hours before bedtime each night for five consecutive nights. This was repeated with printed books.  The order was randomized with some reading the iPad first and others reading the printed book first.  Participants reading on...
Ideal meal after an intense workout

Ideal meal after an intense workout

Is there really such a thing like recommended diet after an intense workout? If yes, is it specific? Should you look at the caloric requirement? How about your BMI? Well, these are just some of the questions one might ask when you know they are really serious about it. Heres’s the thing, the ideal meal should contain this food group distribution to keep your body toned and healthy. Most of all, here are some tips you may want to consider: 1. Eat your largest meal of the day after exercise. 2. Eat more vegetables than fruits with this meal. 3. Choose mostly whole foods with minimal processing. 4. Choose local or organic foods whenever possible. 5. Use smaller or larger plates based on your own body size.   If you are curious with the types of food you should eat, you can refer to out 20 post work-out...
Who has cavities? Nearly all Americans, study finds

Who has cavities? Nearly all Americans, study finds

ATLANTA, GEORGIA–New study from the National Institutes of Health and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention revealed that mostly all American adults have tooth decay, and more than a quarter have cavities that have not been treated. “Approximately 91 percent of U.S. adults aged 20-64 had dental caries in permanent teeth in 2011-2012,” the report, published by CDC’s National Center for Health Statistics, finds. Having been known around the world for having strong, white teeth, dentists see something different inside a patient’s mouth and according to survey, by the time an American hit 65, 96 percent will have tooth decay. Dr. Bruce Dye of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research, who led the study shared that, “It is not what people are doing wrong. It is maybe what we can do better.” A lot has to do with access to dentists. With the absence of health insurance coverage for dental care, or living in areas where dentists are not common, an individual is more likely to have tooth decay, and far more likely to go without fillings. Dye and colleagues write, “The prevalence of untreated dental caries was nearly twice as high for non-Hispanic black adults (42 percent) compared with non-Hispanic white (22 percent) and Asian (17 percent) adults.” They used a national survey of tens of thousands of Americans, called the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, for their report. About 19 percent of people 65 and over have no teeth at all. This rises to 26 percent of people 75 and older. This report looked at adults. A previous survey found 42 percent of...
20 Post-Workout Foods

20 Post-Workout Foods

Conscious about your body and wanting to make sure each exercise take effect? Toning your body is not just about proper exercise. Most of it have something to do with what you eat too. Here are 20 post-work out foods you may want to consider in your diet. Have something to add? Let us know by commenting below....

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